Videos

Controlling Number Entry Using Sifteo Cubes

As you have probably gathered, I am really interested in Number Entry. I’ve been thinking a lot about how we enter numbers – whether we think of them as a series of digits, or as full numbers. This has implications for the way we might ask people to enter numbers on an interface.

I was given an opportunity to test this out recently at the CHI+MED interface hack day. Last Friday (9/8/13) a group from CHI+MED came together at Swansea university to hack some interfaces to investigate novel number entry methods.

I got a chance to play with some Sifteo Cubes. Sifteo Cubes are fun little blocks with screens that are aware of which other blocks they are next to. This allows for some fun physical interaction, with the user picking up and moving the blocks around.

At a previous idea generation session, we came up with the idea that you might want to let a user enter numbers on the sifteo blocks using both a digit and number strategy. The difference between the two meaning that you could either control the number digit-by-digit (that is, incrementing the digit 9 in the number 659 would result in 650) or by controlling the whole number (that is incrementing the digit 9 in 659 would result in 660).

Using one Sifteo block as the “controller” and the other two as the numbers, I created a system to allow the user to enter numbers using any strategy they like. See the video for an example. You can see that they can control each block separately. When the blocks are joined, the entire number can be incremented (by placing the control block to the left or right) or just the digit can be changed (by placing the control block above or below).

Programming the Sifteo blocks was an interesting challenge. You need to program in C++ (a language I haven’t looked at for a few years) and at first, reading the example code was a bit daunting. But after a while I managed to hack it together. The really strange thing about doing this was working with images. Unlike many programs where you can directly write text (or numbers) to the screen, when programming for the Sifteo cubes you are dealing with lots of static images, and swapping them in and out as you need. Meaning in my application in the video, I have 10 different image files, one for each digit.

I enjoyed the experience of hacking and playing with the blocks. I think there are some interesting questions that could be explored using them. We will see!

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